In Brief:

On this site you will find pictures and information about some of the electronic, electrical, electrotechnical and mecanichal technology relics that the Frank Sharp Private museum has accumulated over the years .
There are lots of vintage electrical and electronic items that have not survived well or even completely disappeared and forgotten.

Or are not being collected nowadays in proportion to their significance or prevalence in their heyday, this is bad and the main part of the death land. The heavy, ugly sarcophagus; models with few endearing qualities, devices that have some over-riding disadvantage to ownership such as heavy weight,toxicity or inflated value when dismantled, tend to be under-represented by all but the most comprehensive collections and museums. They get relegated to the bottom of the wants list, derided as 'more trouble than they are worth', or just forgotten entirely. As a result, I started to notice gaps in the current representation of the history of electronic and electrical technology to the interested member of the public.


Following this idea around a bit, convinced me that a collection of the peculiar alone could not hope to survive on its own merits, but a museum that gave equal display space to the popular and the unpopular, would bring things to the attention of the average person that he has previously passed by or been shielded from. It's a matter of culture. From this, the Tele Video Rama Web Museum concept developed and all my other things too. It's an open platform for all electrical Electronic TV technology to have its few, but NOT last, moments of fame in a working, hand-on environment. We'll never own Colossus or Faraday's first transformer, but I can show things that you can't see at the Science Museum, and let you play with things that the Smithsonian can't allow people to touch, because my remit is different.

There was a society once that was the polar opposite of our disposable, junk society. A whole nation was built on the idea of placing quality before quantity in all things. The goal was not “more and newer,” but “better and higher" .This attitude was reflected not only in the manufacturing of material goods, but also in the realms of art and architecture, as well as in the social fabric of everyday life. The goal was for each new cohort of children to stand on a higher level than the preceding cohort: they were to be healthier, stronger, more intelligent, and more vibrant in every way.

The society that prioritized human, social and material quality is a Winner. Truly, it is the high point of all Western civilization. Consequently, its defeat meant the defeat of civilization itself.
Today, the West is headed for the abyss. For the ultimate fate of our disposable society is for that society itself to be disposed of. And this will happen sooner, rather than later.
OLD, but ORIGINAL, Well made, Funny, Not remotely controlled............. and not Made in CHINA.

HOW TO USE THIS SITE:
- If you landed here via any Search Engine, you will get what you searched for and you can search more using the search this blog feature provided by Google. You can visit more posts scrolling the right blog archive of all posts of the month/year,
or you can click on the main photo-page to start from the main page. It starts from the most recent post to the older post simple clicking on the Older Post button on the bottom of each page after reading , post after post.

You can even visit all posts, time to time, reaching the bottom end of each page then click on the Older Post button.


- If you come here at the main page from a bookmark you can visit all the site scrolling the right blog archive of all posts of the month/year pointing were you want , or more simple You can even visit all blog posts, from newer to older, clicking at the end of each bottom page on the Older Post button.
So you can see all the blog/site content surfing all pages in it.


- The search this blog feature provided by Google is a real search engine. If you're pointing particular things it will search IT for you; or you can place a brand name in the search query at your choice and visit all results page by page. It's useful since the content of the site is very large.

Note that if you don't find what you searched for, try it after a period of time; the site is a never ending job !

Don't forget the past, the end of the world is upon us! Pretty soon it will all turn to dust!

Have big FUN ! !


©2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Frank Sharp - You do not have permission to copy photos and words from this blog, and any content may be never used it for auctions or commercial purposes, however feel free to post anything you see here with a courtesy link back, btw a link to the original post here , is mandatory.
All sets and apparates appearing here are property of
Engineer Frank Sharp. NOTHING HERE IS FOR SALE !

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Thursday, July 28, 2011

MITSUBISHI HS-319EZ YEAR 1985.































The history of Mitsubishi Electric is the history of the development of modern Japan. The company was founded in 1921, when Mitsubishi Shipbuilding Co. (now Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) spun off a factory in Kobe, Japan that made electric motors for ocean-going vessels into a new company called Mitsubishi Electric Corporation.

In that year, the new company entered the consumer sector by manufacturing and marketing an electric fan, which became a hit product. Over the next decade the company succeeded in landing major contracts, including one for the development of an electric railway substation.

In the 1930s Mitsubishi Electric started manufacturing, installing and maintaining elevators and escalators as well as producing electric power generation equipment. The company continued to grow and branch out at a brisk pace, and by 1960 had emerged as one of the most innovative diversified electrical equipment manufacturers in Japan. In the early 1960s the company also turned its attention to environmentally conscious manufacturing techniques -- many years before environmental concern became a serious issue.

Over the next two decades the company began extending its reach overseas while establishing itself as a pioneer in the development of computers, advanced air conditioning systems, automobile electronics, satellites powered by photovoltaic technology, and nuclear power generation.

From 1980 to the present day, the pace at which Mitsubishi Electric has introduced and refined breakthrough technologies and products for the benefit of society, industry and individuals has been nothing less than astonishing. These technologies include the world's first large-scale LED screen for sports arenas, the world's largest CRT television screen for the consumer market, the world's first spiral escalator, the world's fastest elevators, the antenna technology behind the world's first commercial in-flight Internet service, and much more.

Today Mitsubishi Electric is a global giant, with operations in 35 countries, more than 100,000 employees, and consolidated net sales of more than US$32 billion. (Figures are as per Annual Report 2007).



Mitsubishi
An ambitious young man named Yataro Iwasaki launched the first Mitsubishi company--a shipping firm--in 1870. Japan had just emerged from centuries of feudal isolation and was racing to catch up with the West. Yataro's business grew rapidly and diversified into a broad range of manufacturing and commerce. World War II brought an end to Mitsubishi as an integrated organization. But independent companies that trace their roots to the old Mitsubishi are active today in nearly every sector of industry.Yataro Iwasaki was from the city of Kochi on the island of Shikoku, which was the home of the powerful Tosa clan. He worked for the clan and distinguished himself in managing its Osaka trading operations. In 1870, he set up his own shipping company, Tsukumo Shokai, with three steamships chartered from the clan. That was the beginning of Mitsubishi


The name of the new company changed to Mitsukawa Shokai in 1872 and to Mitsubishi Shokai in 1874. Yataro chose a corporate emblem that combined the three oak leaves of the Tosa crest and the three stacked diamonds of his family crest. That emblem is the source of the name, Mitsubishi, which means "three diamonds."

Yataro made a public display of patriotism in 1874, providing ships to carry Japanese troops to Taiwan. That earned the gratitude of the government, which rewarded him with 30 vessels. Yataro changed his company's name to Mitsubishi Mail Steamship in 1875, when it inherited the employees and facilities of a mail service disbanded by the government.


Mitsubishi Mail Steamship inaugurated service to China and Russia and enjoyed a virtual monopoly on overseas routes. But the political winds shifted against Mitsubishi in the early 1880s, and the government sponsored the establishment of a competitor. The ensuing competition nearly bankrupted both companies.

Government intervention produced a temporary truce. But cutthroat competition resumed when Yataro died in 1885 and was succeeded by his brother Yanosuke. The feud ended with a government-arbitrated merger in 1885, which created Nippon Yusen--today's NYK Line.


While competition was escalating on the sea, Mitsubishi was diversifying ashore. The company purchased the Yoshioka copper mine in Akita and Takashima coal mine in Nagasaki. It leased the Nagasaki Shipbuilding Yard from the government in 1884 and later engineered Japan's first domestically produced steel steamship there.

Mitsubishi continued to grow and diversify under the autocratic leadership of Yanosuke Iwasaki. He bought up more mines to provide resources for Mitsubishi and Japan's growing industries. And he dropped "Steamship" from the company name. He also paid the equivalent of approximately US$1 million for 80 acres of swampy marsh next to the Imperial Palace in 1890. Ridiculed at the time, Yanosuke's investment today is worth many billions of dollars.


Yataro's son, Hisaya, assumed the presidency in 1893. The University of Pennsylvania graduate restructured Mitsubishi to support increasingly diverse business operations. He set up divisions for banking, real estate, marketing, and administration, as well as for the original mining and shipbuilding businesses.

Some of Hisaya's private investments are part of today's Mitsubishi companies. He purchased the Kobe Paper Mill, which is today's Mitsubishi Paper Mills. And he backed the founding of Kirin Brewery. His cousin Toshiya founded Asahi Glass, Japan's first successful manufacturer of plate glass.

Mitsubishi management modernized further when Yanosuke's son Koyata succeeded Hisaya as president in 1916. Koyata, a graduate of Cambridge University, incorporated the divisions as semiautonomous companies. He steered Mitsubishi to leadership in such sectors as machinery, electrical equipment, and chemicals. The companies that later became Mitsubishi Heavy Industries developed automobiles, aircraft, tanks, and buses. And Mitsubishi Electric became a leader in electrical machinery and in home appliances.


The Iwasaki family relinquished some of its control over Mitsubishi through a public offering of shares in the core holding company. By the end of World War II, outside investors held more than one-half of the equity.

Koyata Iwasaki encouraged his managers and employees to stand above the xenophobia that swept Japan during the war years. "We count many British and Americans among our business partners," he reminded Mitsubishi executives shortly after the outbreak of hostilities. "They are our friends who have undertaken projects together with us and who have shared interests with us. Should peace come again, they should again become good and faithful friends."


After the war, the allied occupation forces demanded that Japan's big industrial groups disband. Mitsubishi Headquarters disbanded on September 30, 1946, and many of the Mitsubishi companies split into smaller enterprises. The trading arm fragmented into 139 companies. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries became three regional companies. Most of the Mitsubishi companies abandoned the name and emblem under pressure from the occupation forces.

On the outbreak of the Korean War, the occupation policy shifted to an emphasis on industrial and economic reconstruction. Some of the Mitsubishi companies reconstituted themselves, and most began using the name and emblem again. But they retained their autonomy. The companies achieved far more individually and independently than they ever could have accomplished as a single organization. At the same time, they benefit from the shared sense of community that accrues from a common history and corporate culture.



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